Judge Charles Kellogg built the flour mill in 1823 and sold the mill to Horace Rounds in 1851. The mill rem ained in the Rounds family until 1947. It was in 1947 that the mill was then sold to Howard Weed and Leland Weed who became the sole owner in 1953. The mill was
 
bought by two of Leland’s sons, Dale and David, in 1980. After the death of David Weed, Dale Weed became sole owner in 2001. In 2012 Doug Weed bought the business from his father and is now CEO. He is carrying on the family tradition of providing quality products.
Judge Charles Kellogg built the flour mill in 1823 and sold the mill to Horace Rounds in 1851. The mill remained in the Rounds family until 1947. It was in 1947 that the mill was then sold to Howard Weed and Leland Weed who became the sole owner in 1953. The mill was bought by two of Leland’s sons, Dale and David, in 1980. After the death of David Weed, Dale Weed became sole owner in 2001. In 2012 Doug Weed bought the business from his father and is now CEO. He is carrying on the family tradition of providing quality products.
At one time in the 1850’s there were 15 water-powered industries along the banks of Bear Swamp Creek. Now only these two mills remain as a tribute to New Hope’s unique past. Local history contends that the community of New Hope was given its name from the top of its new flour mill in 1823. After the mill’s forty foot, five-sided ridge pole was put in place, a man climbed to the top of the mill and threw a jug of whiskey over his shoulder declaring the town of Sodom to be renamed New Hope. Although New Hope Mills discontinued grinding flour in 1996, it continued production in the original building until moving the packaging and production to a larger facility in Auburn NY in 2004. In 2005, the mill and the saw mill up stream were both added to the New York State and National Register of Historical places.